The Mornin' Mail is published every weekday except major holidays
Tuesday, March 2, 2010 Volume XVIII, Number 177

did ya know?

Did Ya Know?..2010 Project Graduation presents Big Man On Campus, Thursday, March 4, 7 p.m. Adults $5 Student $2

Did Ya Know?. . . Saturday Night Idol finals will be Saturday, March 6 at Fairview Christian Church at 6 p.m.

Did Ya Know?. . Carthage Youth Baseball & Softball Sign-ups will be Monday, March 8 at Fairview Elementary 6-8 p.m.

Did Ya Know? . .The Carthage Shrine Train Crew will be hosting a Hot Dog and Chili Feed on Mar 6th at 6:00 PM. It will be held at the Train Barn on West Mound Street Road in Carthage. Adults $6.00 and kids 12 and under $3.00 . All proceeds go to the Train Crew and are not tax deductible.

today's laugh

Hymns for People Over 50

Give Me the Old Timers Religion

Precious Lord, Take My Hand, And Help Me Up

Just a Slower Walk with Thee

Go Tell It on the Mountain, But Speak Up

Nobody Knows the Trouble I Have Seeing

Guide Me O Thou Great Lord God, I’ve Forgotten Where I’ve Parked The Car

Count Your Many Birthdays, Count Them One By One

1910
INTERESTING MELANGE.
A Chronological Record of Events as they have Transpired in the City and County since our last Issue.

What the Switch Will be Used for.

The new Missouri Pacific switch north of Carthage is to be located about one and one-half miles north of town.

Just north of Carthage there is a heavy grade, which is very stiff for heavy north bound trains. The Joplin and Carthage switch engine which plies between the towns will haul out all loaded freight cars from Carthage onto the new switch. The north bound trains will then get the heavy cars of stone, etc., at the top of the stiff grade, and will not be compelled to pull them up. This knocks out the theory that the prime purpose of putting in the switch was to provide a place for trains to pass.

It has been suggested that the Pacific in building this switch had in mind the placing of a block across the pathway of the proposed P. & G. spur up Spring river valley, but if it is located as far north of town as is now contemplated, it would, of course have no effect on the P. & G.

  Today's Feature

YMCA OFFERS SPRING BREAK VOLLEYBALL.

The Fair Acres Family YMCA is accepting registration for its Volleyball Camp for boys and girls ages 7-14 years. The Camp will be under the direction of Misty DeGonia and others.

This year’s Spring Break Volleyball Camp will run March 15-19 as follows:

1st – 4th Grades: 5:30-6:30 p.m.

5th – 8th Grades: 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Cost for the Camp will be $20 for Y Members and $35 for Non Members.

DeGonia said, "Our Volleyball Camp is designed to teach basic skills of volleyball to both beginners and those playing in school and club volleyball programs. This camp will be skill focused and will maintain a level of ‘fun’ for the campers.We are committed to providing an enriching summer camp experience to each child."

Register at the Y at 2600 S. Grand Ave. in Carthage. Deadline of March 15th.

City Offices Closed Thursday Morning.

City Offices will be closed on Thursday from approx 9:00 AM until Noon to allow employees to attend Pat Woestman’s Funeral.



Just Jake Talkin'
Mornin',

Had a friend who wanted to invest in a business. His idea was to create the perfect system where there weren’t any decisions to be made and all that was necessary was "warm bodies" to carry out the routine tasks.

Now such a system may be possible, but my friend soon discovered in the venture he got involved in could not be made that simple.

Any venture needs a set of basic guidelines, or policy, to guide the routine. The problem is that there are always situations that come along that weren’t planned or opportunities that weren’t foreseen.

Any project needs check points to gauge progress, but feeling the necessity to plan every minute detail can spell doom to whatever good might come.

Sometime even movin’ in the wrong direction is better than sittin’ still.

This is some fact, but mostly,

Just Jake Talkin’.


Sponsored by Carthage Printing Weekly Columns

Diet, Pain and Diverticulitis

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I need information on how to avoid flare-ups of diverticulitis. I am a 53-year-old female. I was diagnosed with diverticulitis in 2008 after suffering for months from discomfort that finally became unbearable. The doctor gave me an antibiotic that cleared the problem up. What I need to know is this: How long after eating a problem food does discomfort ensue? I’ve tried to tie discomfort to a particular food. I just can’t figure out which ones cause the problem. For instance, if I have a problem on Tuesday afternoon, would that be from food I ate Tuesday morning, or the day before, or the day before that? -- D.F.

ANSWER: You need a clearer picture of what causes diverticular pain. You’re barking up the wrong tree. Diverticula are small bulges on the colon’s outer wall. The bulges are the lining of the colon that has been pushed through the muscular colon wall and has popped out on its outer surface. They are pea-size to marble-size. When the necks of diverticula become obstructed, bacteria within the diverticula causes swelling and pain. Prevention of diverticula formation and diverticula obstruction centers on a high-fiber diet. A particular food isn’t usually the culprit. A lack of fiber is the troublemaker.

Fiber holds on to water and keeps the food residue soft. If the residue hardens, the colon has to generate great force to move it along, and that force is responsible for diverticula formation. You need to get 25 grams to 30 grams of fiber daily. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains are fiber sources. Whole grains are grains that haven’t been refined. They retain their outer coat -- bran. Bran is excellent fiber.

Diverticulitis -- inflamed diverticula -- produces pain, most often felt in the lower left side of the abdomen. Sometimes it leads to rectal bleeding. An attack of diverticulitis calls for a change in diet, either to a liquid one or one with soft foods.

If you still want to track a particular food as the cause of a diverticulitis attack, I’ll give you the rough time sequences of food passage. It takes one to two days for food to pass from mouth to the end of the colon. At most, it takes three days. Anything beyond that time is abnormal.

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